halloweencrafts:

DIY Skeleton Cannibal Meat and Cheese Platter from HeatherEve1234 on the Halloween Forum. For more Halloween food and drink ideas go here:halloweencrafts.tumblr.com/tagged/food
HeatherEve1234 wrote:

Large oval platter, covered with a bed of lettuce, laid out my (washed) plastic skeleton (found him at Wal-Mart I believe - 3’, bent his knees to fit all on the platter) filled his rib cage with meat (hard salami) and arranged the cheese slices around him. Used long fondue forks as serving utensils, they look sort of like spears or harpoons


Brilliant.

halloweencrafts:

DIY Skeleton Cannibal Meat and Cheese Platter from HeatherEve1234 on the Halloween Forum. For more Halloween food and drink ideas go here:halloweencrafts.tumblr.com/tagged/food

HeatherEve1234 wrote:

Large oval platter, covered with a bed of lettuce, laid out my (washed) plastic skeleton (found him at Wal-Mart I believe - 3’, bent his knees to fit all on the platter) filled his rib cage with meat (hard salami) and arranged the cheese slices around him. Used long fondue forks as serving utensils, they look sort of like spears or harpoons

Brilliant.

mszombi:

halloweencrafts:

DIY Spell and Potion Book Tutorial from Better After. This is a really good tutorial using plastic toys, a glue gun, cardstock, paper towels etc… This DIY is based on a tutorial by SEEING THINGS - my favorite Halloween Blog that had great printables and tutorials and is now DEAD & GONE. This is why if I see a printable I like, I don’t wait until later to download it.

Woah, this is next-level rad and could be adapted to all sorts of neat projects!!! =O

mszombi:

halloweencrafts:

DIY Spell and Potion Book Tutorial from Better After. This is a really good tutorial using plastic toys, a glue gun, cardstock, paper towels etc… This DIY is based on a tutorial by SEEING THINGS - my favorite Halloween Blog that had great printables and tutorials and is now DEAD & GONE. This is why if I see a printable I like, I don’t wait until later to download it.

Woah, this is next-level rad and could be adapted to all sorts of neat projects!!! =O

pennyfornasa:

On July 24th, 2006, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) officially defined what constitutes a planet. For a celestial body in our solar system to be defined as a planet, it must:1. Be in orbit of the Sun2. Have sufficient mass to assume a nearly round shape (officially known as hydrostatic equilibrium)3. “Clear the neighborhood” around its orbitThis designation meant that Pluto — first discovered in 1930 by Clyde W. Tombaugh — was no different than any of the other 70,000 icy objects that comprise the Kuiper Belt, a region that extends from the orbit of Neptune out to 55 astronomical units (55 times the distance of the Earth to the Sun).After decades of observation, astronomers have continued to discover other large Kuiper Belt objects, such as Eris in 2005, which was determined to be larger than Pluto itself. The discovery of Eris — which has approximately 25% more mass than Pluto — posed an interesting question to the scientific community: would this object be the 10th planet in our solar system? "If Neptune were analogized with a Chevy Impala in mass, then how big is Pluto compared to that? Pluto would be a matchbox car sitting on the curb." - Neil deGrasse TysonBased upon the IAU’s definition above, any object that doesn’t meet the third criteria is classified as a dwarf planet — including Pluto, Eris, and many of the other objects located in the distant reaches of the Kuiper Belt. In spite of this new designation, Pluto still holds a special spot in the hearts of scientists and astronomers, as NASA has sent their New Horizons spacecraft to observe it closely. Slated to arrive in 2015, New Horizons will capture the first close-up images of the surface.Image Credit: PBSSources:1. Pluto and the Developing Landscape of Our Solar Systemhttp://goo.gl/ncuu2x2. Why Pluto is No Longer a Planethttp://goo.gl/ekryL

pennyfornasa:


On July 24th, 2006, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) officially defined what constitutes a planet. For a celestial body in our solar system to be defined as a planet, it must:

1. Be in orbit of the Sun
2. Have sufficient mass to assume a nearly round shape (officially known as hydrostatic equilibrium)
3. “Clear the neighborhood” around its orbit

This designation meant that Pluto — first discovered in 1930 by Clyde W. Tombaugh — was no different than any of the other 70,000 icy objects that comprise the Kuiper Belt, a region that extends from the orbit of Neptune out to 55 astronomical units (55 times the distance of the Earth to the Sun).

After decades of observation, astronomers have continued to discover other large Kuiper Belt objects, such as Eris in 2005, which was determined to be larger than Pluto itself. The discovery of Eris — which has approximately 25% more mass than Pluto — posed an interesting question to the scientific community: would this object be the 10th planet in our solar system? 

"If Neptune were analogized with a Chevy Impala in mass, then how big is Pluto compared to that? Pluto would be a matchbox car sitting on the curb." - Neil deGrasse Tyson

Based upon the IAU’s definition above, any object that doesn’t meet the third criteria is classified as a dwarf planet — including Pluto, Eris, and many of the other objects located in the distant reaches of the Kuiper Belt. In spite of this new designation, Pluto still holds a special spot in the hearts of scientists and astronomers, as NASA has sent their New Horizons spacecraft to observe it closely. Slated to arrive in 2015, New Horizons will capture the first close-up images of the surface.

Image Credit: PBS

Sources:
1. Pluto and the Developing Landscape of Our Solar System
http://goo.gl/ncuu2x
2. Why Pluto is No Longer a Planet
http://goo.gl/ekryL